issue

Infrastructure

D+

RATING BY AMERICAN
SOCIETY OF CIVIL
ENGINEERS OF
UNITED STATES
INFRASTRUCTURE.

$2

TRILLION

10-YEAR
INVESTMENT GAP.

29,000

JOBS

PER $1.3 BILLION
INVESTMENT, ACCORDING
TO STANDARD & POOR’S.

The American Society of Civil Engineers gives the U.S.’s infrastructure a D+ rating.

America’s roads, rails, ports, and airports are aging, overcrowded, and increasingly outdated. For many cities, business essentials—like electric power, clean drinking water, and Internet connectivity—are growing less reliable.

Moreover, federal funding isn’t just inadequate, it’s erratic. Congress used to work with governors on 10-year highway spending plans. This allowed states and local governments to take the long-term view that infrastructure programs require. For most of the past decade, Congress authorized highway funding in three- to nine-month increments, making long-term planning impracticable.

The good news? In 2015, Congress passed a $305 billion 5-year highway investment bill. Mayors, governors and local business leaders are developing alternative financing models. They are also sharing “smart city” strategies that integrate technology into our infrastructure to improve efficiency and convenience.

Business Leaders on Infrastructure

American competitiveness in the 21st Century is at risk as we continue to under-invest in vital infrastructure: roads and bridges; power grid and generation; ports; internet capacity. Initiatives like the Clean Power Plan and others create jobs, drive efficiencies for our economy, and ensure American leadership for decades to come.

Frank Wells, President, World Power & Water,Saint Petersburg, FL

Our business relies on trucking for both receiving our material and shipping our material. Our business is growing 200% annually and we receive and send out over 50 deliveries per week. Cutting funding to fix freeways would be a mistake that would cost the state money in the long term.

Carter Hallock, CEO, Rethink Green,Martinez, CA

Transportation funding is vital in helping the economy get back on its feet.

James Paniagua, CFO, Port Solutions Logistics,San Diego, CA

As a start-up company focused on sustainable freight transportation, the U.S. needs to think long-term about how it will stay internationally and nationally competitive, especially when it comes to the nation’s ports–a major component to the national economy that needs to be bolstered and sustained.

Sherwood Egbert, GRID Logistics, Inc.,Thousand Oaks, CA

Give your business advice on infrastructure.